iPSC Core

iPSC Core

iPSC Core
Director: Derek Dykxhoorn, Ph.D.

The development of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has ushered in a new era of clinical and basic research into human disorders. Patient-derived cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and skin fibroblasts, are reprogrammed into iPSCs that allow researchers to examine a wide variety of disorders directly in the cells most relevant for specific diseases. These stem cells have the same genetic makeup as the individual from whom they were developed providing an unparalleled opportunity to study the impact of specific genetic variants on disease development. Given the promise of these cells, the iPSC Core Facility was established to support HIHG investigator and the broader University of Miami research community in the development and implementation of human stem cell-based models of disease. The iPSC Core Facility is equipped for the specialized production, maintenance, expansion, and preservation of iPSC lines from a variety of different cell types. In addition, the iPSC Core Facility provides training and consultation services for the incorporation of iPSC-based approaches in disease modeling, including the development and optimization of differentiation approaches for multiple cell types, such as cortical neurons, sensory neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and cardiomyocytes.

The IPSC Core facility is located within the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics Center for Molecular Genetics with a dedicated tissue culture suite which includes multiple tissue culture grade biocontainiment hoods, biocontained fluorescent and dissecting microscopes for imaging and iPSC colony isolation, multiple CO2 and Trigas Incubators, an Axion Maestro multielectrode array reader, a Sartorius IncuCyte Zoom live cell imaging system, an EVOS fl auto 2.0 fluorescent imaging system, an Amaxa 4D-Nucleofector, and an Accuri C6 flow cytometer. This facility is located in the same area as the microscopy core facility. Samples can be banked locally or reposited into the HIHG CGT biorepository for long-term storage.